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Archive for the ‘Recipes’ Category

Savor Our Seasons: Eggs

By Liza Drew, RD

EggFlavorful Fact: Humans aren’t the only creatures that are strongly affected by the absence of sunlight in winter. If hens don’t get 12 hours of sunlight a day, their egg production declines. At least 14 hours of light is beneficial for egg development, which is why hens are most productive in spring and summer months.

In my opinion, eggs are the perfect food. They’re versatile, delicious, full of nutrients, and beautifully packaged in a biodegradable shell. However, eggs have received some bad press over the years due to their cholesterol levels. Researchers are now finding that cholesterol in the foods we eat doesn’t have a very great affect on our blood cholesterol levels. Also, not all eggs are created equal. Fresh local eggs from chickens that were allowed to scratch around for bugs have higher levels of omega-3 oils and other beneficial nutrients. Eggs also match perfectly with healthy foods such as leafy greens. One of my favorite speedy dinners is kale sautéed with garlic and a soft cooked egg on top. These spinach squares satisfy that same craving in a bite-sized version that’s perfect to bring to parties or to serve as an appetizer.

Try this Recipe: Spring Spinach Squares

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Spring Spinach Squares

Ingredients:

  • 4 Tbsp. butter
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 cup milk
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ½ tsp. ground black pepper
  • 1 tsp. baking powder
  • 1 cup flour
  • 2, 10 oz. packages frozen spinach, thawed and drained or 1 lb fresh spinach, wilted
  • 8 oz. grated sharp cheddar cheese
  • 1 cup crumbled goat cheese

Method:
Preheat oven to 350˚.  Place cubed butter in the bottom of a 9×13 pan, and put in oven to melt. Meanwhile, beat eggs with milk, salt, and pepper. Add flour and baking powder, stirring until combined. Fold in spinach and cheeses.  Remove pan from the oven and tilt to coat with butter. Pour batter into pan and bake for about 40 minutes or until golden brown. Allow to cool, and then cut into small squares.

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Tuscan Hummus

From Glenn Sibley, Our Prepared Food Manager

This creamy smooth hummus is made with cannellini beans, instead of chickpeas. Try it at home today and look forward to buying it at the co-op in early April!

  • 30 oz cannellini beans rinsed and drained
  • 5 garlic cloves peeled
  • 1/2 cup sesame seed paste (tahini)
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1/4 cup lemon juice
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • Pinch of ground coriander
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper

Blend all the ingredients until smooth and enjoy.

Member-Owner Feedback:

Upon receiving one of your latest news letters, I decided to try Glenn Sibley’s Tuscan Hummus recipe because it looked like a winner. The verdict: It is an excellent recipe and it should sell well! The only thing I changed was the salt amount. I added only 1 tsp of sea salt vs 1 1/2 as recommended. We are thrilled to have a new recipe but equally thrilled that you will have this one in store when we are rushed for time. 

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Savor Our Seasons: Dairy

By Liza Drew, RD

Flavorful Fact: Currently there are about 130 dairy farms in New Hampshire, however this is a great decline from the past. This is due to many factors, including the Dairy Termination Program of 1986, which led to the close of about 60 farms.

Manning Hill Farm Milk (Photo: Kimberly Peck Photography)

Manning Hill Farm Milk (Photo: Kimberly Peck Photography)

Dairy has long been a large part of New Hampshire’s agricultural economy, particularly along the Connecticut river and Monadnock region. This is good news for its residents because the taste of fresh local milk is truly one of life’s simple pleasures. Dairy is also a local product that is available year-round, though production declines in winter months. If it’s too blustery outside for a cold glass of milk to feel right, try this creamy homemade chai, which will warm you up and make your house smell delicious.

Try this Recipe: Homemade Spicy Chai

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Homemade Spicy Chai

Ingredients:

  • 2 tbsp loose-leaf black tea
  • 1 tbsp peeled and sliced fresh ginger
  • 1 tsp fennel seeds
  • 4 cardamom pods, split
  • 6 black peppercorns
  • 8 corriander seeds
  • 6 whole cloves
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 2 cups whole milk
  • 2 cups water
  • honey to taste

Method:

Toast spices (not ginger or tea) in a dry pan until fragrant, about five minutes. Lightly crush with a mortar and pestle or back of a spoon.  In a small saucepan, heat 2 cups water, milk, ginger, and spices. Once brought to a light simmer, add tea, cover and let steep for 20 minutes. Sweeten with honey if desired. Strain through cheesecloth or a fine sieve into warmed cups. Enjoy.

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Savor Our Seasons: Celeriac

By Liza Drew, RD

Flavorful Fact: Though it was mentioned in Homer’s Odyssey, celeriac (aka celery root) did not become commonly used until the 1600s, particularly in France, and is still unfamiliar to most Americans to this day.

celeriacCeleriac is a root vegetable, with a thin and bumpy, slightly hairy skin. It likely wouldn’t win a popularity (or beauty) contest, but celeriac is a vegetable triple-threat: nutritious, delicious, and versatile.  This close relative to stalk celery has a similar flavor, but a texture more like a turnip. It grows well in New Hampshire and can be stored throughout the winter.

It makes a luscious side dish when mashed either on its own or combined with potatoes. It can also be eaten raw, and is particularly tasty when thinly sliced and tossed with apples, red onions and a creamy dressing for a crunchy winter salad. However, my favorite way to use celeriac is to add it to soups, especially a creamy pureed soup like this one.

Try this Recipe: Creamy Celeriac Soup with Herb Croutons

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Ingredients:

  • 2 tbsp butter
  • 1 large celeriac, peeled and cubed
  • 1 large (or 2 medium) starchy potatoes, peeled and cubed
  • 2 tart apples, peeled and cubed
  • 1 small onion, diced
  • 4 cups (or more) chicken or vegetable stock
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 cups cubed crusty bread
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 sprig fresh thyme, de-stemmed
  • 4 sage leaves, sliced

Method:

Melt butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add celeriac, potatoes, apples and onions and sauté until apples begin to soften. Add stock and simmer until potatoes and celeriac are tender. Puree soup adding more broth as needed to reach desired consistency. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

For croutons, heat oil in a large skillet over low heat. Add garlic and herbs being careful that garlic doesn’t burn. Add bread cubes to pan and stir over low heat until croutons become crispy, about 10 minutes. Allow croutons to cool slightly and serve on top of celeriac soup.

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